A study showed menstrual changes associated with the Covid-19 vaccine

A study showed menstrual changes associated with the Covid-19 vaccine

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Around the 42% of women who took part in a survey and received the vaccine against it Covid-19 said if your menstrual cycle has changedl, according to a NEW study of 39,129 people in the United States.

The results of the survey published by the American newspaper New York Timesfound that 42% of women had heavier bleeding than normal after being vaccinated against the coronavirus, while 44% reported no change.

The authors of the study, Catherine Lee, Professor, Department of Anthropology, Tulane University, New Orleans; Y Eleanor J JunkinsProfessor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, clarified that 40% of this sample had this experience “That doesn’t mean that’s the rate in the world.”

Coronavirus vaccinations
The authors began their research by noting that in early 2021, many people began reporting that they had unexpected menstrual bleeding after vaccination.

“We cannot compare the frequency of different experiences here with the general population”pointed out the specialists.

The specialists also noted that studies were conducted on the interaction between vaccines and the menstrual cycle “They are few and far between” and among the examples they mentioned one from 1913, which found that the typhoid vaccine was associated with menstrual irregularities, or the studies on hepatitis B and human papilloma virus, which also suggested that menstruation might be altered .

The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines against Covid-19 would accelerate the emergence of new side effects

With that in mind, the authors began the research by noting that in early 2021, many people were beginning to report having unexpected menstrual bleeding after vaccination.

Katharine Lee warned that this is not a reason to worry women: “I think it’s important for people to know that this can happen so they don’t panic, don’t get shocked and don’t run out of supplies. “

What the study says about the effects of the vaccine on the menstrual cycle

The study was published in the journal scientific advances, and was based on a survey started on April 7, 2021 for 12 weeks. It first started on Twitter to recruit people who are currently or previously menstruating and have been vaccinated, and then spread to other social networks and media.

The people interviewed were between 18 and 80 years old, all participants were fully vaccinated Pfizer, Moderna, AstraZeneca, Johnson & Johnsonalongside other vaccinations (at least 14 days after one or two required doses as this was before booster shots) and had not contracted (diagnosed or suspected) Covid-19.

From a sample of 39,129 people, the survey showed that 42% of people with regular menstrual cycles bled more than normal, while 44% reported no change after vaccination, the authors said.

That
Katharine Lee warned that this is not a reason to worry women: “I think it’s important for people to know that this can happen so they don’t get scared, they don’t get shocked and they don’t run out of supplies.” “

In addition, among respondents who do not normally menstruate, There have also been patients who reported breakthrough bleeding after vaccination. According to the study, increased or intermenstrual bleeding was significantly associated with age, systemic side effects of the vaccine (fever or fatigue), history of pregnancy or childbirth, and race.

In this respect, the main results indicate this “Heavier menstrual flow was more likely in respondents who were non-white, Hispanic/Latino, older, had a diagnosed reproductive disorder, were using hormonal birth control, have been pregnant in the past (regardless of whether they had not given birth) or had a fever or tiredness after the vaccination.

Vaccines, they said, “work by mobilizing the immune system to protect against disease when exposure occurs,” and this immune activation “may also be a cascade of other localized inflammatory responses (e.g., pain at the injection site) or systemic (eg, fatigue and/or fever).”

The survey, they explained, consisted of “exploratory and blended methods” aimed at capturing a wide range of responses “Provide a description of trends for clinicians and the public.”

g / ds

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